International Journal of Entomology Research

International Journal of Entomology Research


International Journal of Entomology Research
International Journal of Entomology Research
Vol. 3, Issue 2 (2018)

Larval abundance, distribution and species composition of mosquitoes in Obio-Akpor Lga, Rivers state, Nigeria


Eze, Nwadiuto Chinwe, Ebuka Kingsley Ezihe, Chukwu Maryrose Chidimma

This survey was carried out to determine the larval distribution, abundance and their habitat in Obio-Akpor local government of Rivers State. Larval sampling was carried out weekly in the four communities selected in Obio-Akpor local government for three months both in natural and man-made habitats. For standardization, ten dips were collected during sampling in natural habitats using the dipper while hand pippetes and laddles were used for sampling in man-made containers. The larvae collected were raised to the fourth and pupated with each mosquito cage containing a single collection from a particular type of breeding sites. A total of 1180 larvae were collected in the study. The abundance and distribution of mosquito larvae across the study period showed October had the highest number of larvae (n= 690) followed by September (n=305) while November had the least (n= 185) and was statistically significant difference in mean amount of larvae in the months (P>0.01). Across location, Choba (134.3±33.0) had the highest mean abundance of larvae followed by Rumuokoro (91.3±39.01), Alakahia (90±32.10), and Ozuoba (77.7±22.8) had the least and it was not statistically significant difference (P>0.773). Mosquito species identified included four species of Anopheles: An. gambiae s.1, An.funestus, An. coustani and An. nili; three species of Culex: Cx. quinquifasciatus, Cx. poicilipes and Cx. tigripes and three species of Aedes: Aedes aegypti, Ae. albopictus and Ae. africanus. An. gambiae sl was the most abundant (17%) and dispersed in all the sampling sites followed by Cx. quinquinfasciatus (15%). The finding that mosquito species breeds in natural and man-made containers give concern and calls for urgent larval control. Proper health education and awareness on environmental management is necessary to discourage people from creating breeding sites.
Pages : 85-90